Sock-Doc https://sock-doc.com Natural Injury Treatment & Prevention for the Athlete Within Sat, 24 Feb 2018 03:09:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Natural Injury Treatment & Prevention for the Athlete Within Sock-Doc Natural Injury Treatment & Prevention for the Athlete Within Sock-Doc http://sock-doc.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg https://sock-doc.com Plantar Fasciitis: Healing Up Your Heel Pain https://sock-doc.com/plantar-fasciitis-video/ https://sock-doc.com/plantar-fasciitis-video/#respond Fri, 23 Feb 2018 01:12:38 +0000 https://sock-doc.com/?p=30461 In this video I discuss the muscles associated with plantar fasciitis, why people get this type of foot pain, and what you can do with respect to plantar fasciitis natural treatments. See the accompanying plantar fasciitis article here!    Video Transcript Hey, this is Dr. Gangemi, and I’ve got ...

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In this video I discuss the muscles associated with plantar fasciitis, why people get this type of foot pain, and what you can do with respect to plantar fasciitis natural treatments. See the accompanying plantar fasciitis article here!
 

Video Transcript

Hey, this is Dr. Gangemi, and I’ve got a new Sock Doc video for you here. It’s been several years, almost three, since my last Sock Doc video, and seven years since the original Sock Doc site started as well as my first video on plantar fasciitis. And this video is on that topic, plantar fasciitis. A lot of people have this ailment, this pain in their foot. So, I wanna do a little recap and review and share some, perhaps, some new information to help you with your plantar fascia issues.I have written a new article on the Sock Doc site explaining, actually, why plantar fasciitis, that term is actually incorrect. You have no fascia in the bottom of your foot according to most renowned anatomists. You actually have something called aponeurosis. So, overall, the term plantar fasciitis is the wrong term to use, but you can read more about that on the site. This video is more to show you on how to identify where certain myofascial or trigger points may be that you can use as your own therapy to help yourself or your patients, clients, friends, or whoever who might have plantar fasciitis.

Typically, with plantar fasciitis, you have pain in the bottom of your foot, of your heel, your calcaneus bone. But you can actually have it in your arch, towards the ball of your foot, like where your metatarsals are, which eventually make up your phalanges, your toes. So, you can have… It’s diagnosed as plantar fasciitis anywhere in the bottom of your foot, really doesn’t matter for our purposes. We’re gonna be talking about two main players with this ailment, with this condition. One is your tibialis posterior muscle that helps pronate and supinate your foot properly when you walk, and especially when you run; stabilizes your ankle, super important muscle. And two, your soleus muscle, one of your calf muscles, the lower one underneath your thicker gastroc.

So, your tibialis posterior muscle actually helps join your tibia and your fibula up here in your lower leg, especially at the top portion, in what’s called your interosseous membrane. It really stabilizes this area. So, if we come closer with the video here, you’re going to look for trigger points along the tibia. You wanna get right underneath the bone there and kinda like push up and in into that tibia region. You wanna keep the muscle relaxed, so don’t tense there, and look for trigger points all the way down on the inside of this bone, so kinda like underneath your calf, and all the way down around your medial malleolus, this bone here, and then into your arch here. You might find some tenderness in here in the arch area, where the connective tissue starts to go into the bottom of your foot.

Remember, like I say in most Sock Doc videos and in articles, you stay away from the area where you have pain. So, if you’re having pain in the arch there, or pain in the heel, or wherever it may be, you’re typically only going to irritate it more if you start mashing around in there. A couple other points I wanted to show you that a lot of people have issues with that is good for you to see. One is, on the top here, you wanna try and get underneath towards your knee, where that tibialis posterior originates, and it’s behind your tibia. So, obviously, that’s hard to get to, and you’re not gonna be able to get to right on it. So, you’re gonna kinda go up at an angle here and come right behind the top of the bone and push up towards your knee. So, I am pushing up in here towards like my, what’s called my tibial tuberosity here, this bone that sticks out, where your patellar tendon goes into. So, you’re gonna push up towards this angle, like that, and look for tender areas there.

Also, from the back side, look right behind your fibula bone. This bone that sticks out at the top on the outside of your lower leg, because there’s tibialis posterior muscle attachments there. So, you might have a tender spot right there, and you can see if I put my foot like this, it actually tenses my calf up. So, I don’t want that. I’d want it relaxed, like here, or, you know, if I’m sitting like this. So, you want the muscle relaxed, so look for tender spots in there, like right behind the fibula. Okay? So, that’s for the tibialis posterior.

What you might notice with your tibialis posterior if you’re standing, you might end up doing like this. You might kick your foot out. If you see yourself or note yourself standing like that, you probably have a weakness in your tibialis posterior muscle. You might also develop calluses on the inside of your arches too, if you’re rolling inwards too much when you’re running.

Okay. The next muscle is your soleus, that’s this lower calf muscle, the thinner of the two, underneath your big, more meatier gastroc. The soleus muscle, I discuss it a lot on the Sock Doc site, because it’s implicated with shin splints, Achilles tendinitis, of course, people who get, you know, the pump bumps in back where it catches onto your calcaneus. It makes up a lot of that connective tissue on the bottom of your foot, along with your tibialis posterior muscle. That’s why these are more of that plantar fasciitis-type disorders that people have pain with. So, with your soleus, much more simple to find these trigger points. You’re pretty much gonna go right in the back of your leg, underneath the gastroc here, maybe push up underneath that meaty part a little bit. Of course, I wouldn’t be able to get it like this, it’s more for visualization here for the video, but you’re gonna look all throughout here, maybe squeeze the calf like this, or come here. I’d be doing more like this with my leg up and pushing straight down with my thumbs into the calf area. Perhaps, you know, like pinching my Achilles and then coming down and also looking for areas in the bottom of my foot.

Again, even if my heel is hurting, which is the most common area for plantar fasciitis, I am going to look above in that soleus region, in this case, or down in the…towards the ball of my foot, look for tender areas in there. If I have plantar fasciitis in that area of my foot though, I’m gonna look more proximal, meaning closer, or distal, away from. Okay? And stay off the area where it’s hurting.

Read the article or check out my article on…with the updated article on plantar fasciitis. I’ll show you some other more…some other things you can do and when you want to, perhaps, use a cushion in your shoe to dampen the pain. Of course, why you don’t ever, in my opinion, want to use orthotics, arch supports, or any other supportive device in your footwear to support your dysfunction, and therefore, try to alter your pain pattern only to create other pain later on.

Lots of other videos on the Sock Doc site. Please like and share, and I hope you enjoy this video. Thanks for watching.

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Plantar Fasciitis: The Pain You’ve Got That Doesn’t Even Really Exist https://sock-doc.com/plantar-fasciitis-natural-treatments/ https://sock-doc.com/plantar-fasciitis-natural-treatments/#comments Fri, 23 Feb 2018 00:41:24 +0000 https://sock-doc.com/?p=30452 It’s just your imagination – this pain that you or your trusted practitioner has diagnosed as “plantar fasciitis” – because it’s impossible to have such a problem where there is just no fascia in the body! Ok, it’s not in your head, and naming an injury doesn’t by any means ...

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Plantar Fasciitis Natural TreatmentsIt’s just your imagination – this pain that you or your trusted practitioner has diagnosed as “plantar fasciitis” – because it’s impossible to have such a problem where there is just no fascia in the body! Ok, it’s not in your head, and naming an injury doesn’t by any means explain why you have the problem in the first place, let alone tell you how to go about correcting it, even if the name is completely wrong. You see, this area we’ve been calling “fascia” due to the connective tissue aspects of that tissue located on the bottom of your foot from your heel to base of your toes is really not fascia, but what’s called aponeurosis. An aponeurosis is a tendinous tissue expansion connecting muscle (in this case primarily the muscles coming from the lower leg), to the parts which they move (in this case the foot). This band of fibrous connective tissue can become problematic resulting in pain – maybe acute pain (i.e.“fasciitis” or “aponeurositis”) – or a chronic degenerative condition (i.e. “fasciosis” or “aponeurosis-osis?”).

Now that I’m through being grammatically and anatomically correct let’s actually get to what’s important – why your foot hurts and how to go about fixing it hopefully once and for all. Also, to sorta completely undo what I just said I’m going to go back to using the term plantar fasciitis. Why would I do this if it’s completely the wrong name to call it? Two simple reasons: 1) It’s what people still call it today and what they understand; nobody is talking about their aponeurositis. 2) This is a website, therefore I have to write according to the laws of Google so it, and all of its web-crawling bots, can see, identify, link, and properly score this article as something of value. People search for terms with the words “plantar fasciitis.” So it’s as simple as that; call me a sell-out.

The Muscles Involved With Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis (PF), is when you have pain due to something wrong with that connective tissue on the bottom of the foot. Though typically in the heel region, it can be painful in the arch, or close to the base of the toes around where they bend. So since we’re talking about connective tissues, we have to look at where this connective tissue comes from, as that will help us identify and treat the problem successfully. The two muscles I find to be most important in PF are the tibialis posterior and the soleus.

Plantar Fasciitis Natural Treatments

Posterior Tibialis Dysfunction Stance

The tibialis posterior is a long sheath of muscle running from the upper part of your lower two leg bones (your tibia and fibula) all the way down to the inside of your foot into your arch and throughout much of the foot. It is significantly involved in proper foot pronation and ankle supination. Yes, your foot needs to “roll inwards,” or pronate during your gait cycle, especially when you run. Check out the plantar fasciitis video where I show the trigger points to look for along the tibialis posterior as like most ailments you have to look distant to where the problem (pain, in this case) is felt. So don’t mess around directly with that pain in your foot. Also note, as I show in the photo here, that if you have a fatigued tibialis posterior muscle you might lean towards the outside of your foot when you’re standing for a bit.

The soleus is that calf muscle right under and below your gastrocnemius, the upper and thicker calf muscle. The soleus eventually makes up that one tendon that everyone has heard of, the Achilles tendon. That soleus travels down into the tendinous attachments into your foot (yes, the aponeurosis). If your soleus isn’t functioning well you can get anything from shin splints, Achilles tendonitis, heel spurs, Morton’s neuroma, and plantar fasciitis. If your soleus is more of the problem you might feel more pain pushing off (plantar flexion of the foot), walking tippy-toes, and climbing stairs. Again, check out the video for trigger points for the soleus. Also, soleus problems can sometimes cause deep knee pain where tibialis posterior problems can cause medial (inside) or lateral (outside) knee pain due to its influence on lower leg rotation. Let’s move on.

Check out the new Sock Doc Plantar Fasciitis Video to see exactly where these muscles are.

The Reasons for Plantar Fasciitis

There are countless reasons for PF and no, it’s not a “runner’s problem” or an “overweight problem” or a “high arch” or “fallen arch” disorder. PF is essentially from one thing that results in many health problems from pain to many diseases – stress. Of course, saying something is from too much stress is sort of a cop-out because although not necessarily incorrect, it is rather vague. But, as I discuss many, many times throughout the SockDoc site, your feet are a great reflection of stress. In the case of PF, your feet are likely telling you that you are not handling your stress very well.

The tibialis posterior and soleus muscles are two muscles that are closely clinically related to respond to excess stress. The muscles will fatigue (weaken to some degree), resulting in perhaps a foot ailment (PF), or maybe a gait imbalance (and therefore sudden back or hip pain), or maybe some ailment like Morton’s neuroma since those nerves have to go through that “fascia” – or whatever you want to call it.

Plantar Fasciitis Natural Treatments

So if you’re too stressed out, whether from too much training (running, walking, lifting, swimming), too little training (sitting, sleeping, not moving), a poor diet (excess sugars, caffeine, refined inflammatory oils), emotional stress – or whatever the case may be – you just might end up with PF. Therefore, the way to really address the cause of the problem is to address that stress (or stressors) to help heal your PF, regain your health, and hopefully prevent your problem from returning.

But when you’re injured, local treatments are necessary as they’ll help speed up recovery and in this case, get you moving along since you’ll probably want to move using your feet. Just a guess on my part. So go get you a nice pair of orthotics (I’d recommend spending at least $499 on a pair, plus doctor visit), and put them in some super supportive shoes with at least a 24mm stack height – these will also make you look taller, helping you to make more friends.

Of course, it’s just the opposite here on SockDoc where plantar fasciitis natural treatments prevail. Orthotics will only, at best, temporarily “improve” your pain as your foot dysfunction only becomes more of an issue as your gait mechanics are further distorted and you “just somehow” have another injury in a few months or years later. Supportive shoes will do just the same – they support poor function (dysfunction), poor mechanics, and poor foot health. However, if your foot is just killing you, even to just stand on, some cushion is probably a good idea so you’re not in pain as you move through your day as pain is not only going to increase your stress level, but it will most likely cause more issues as you alter your gait to move away from the pain. So cushion a little, but don’t “lift” too much. If your soleus is the reason for your PF then you’ll feel better by shortening the Achilles tendon and that can be accomplished with a bit of a heel lift – 2-4 mm at most – not 1-2 inches, and just until you’re out of distress. You might consider equalizing the other side too, even if asymptomatic. Let’s not create new foot problems.

Check out the new Sock Doc Plantar Fasciitis Video to see how to treat these muscles using simple trigger point therapy.

Preventing Plantar Fasciitis

Preventing injuries involves integration of the health of your entire body, not just one part. So that’s back to stress – eating well, sleeping well, training well, etc. Just spend a few hours or days on sock-doc.com or drgangemi.com! (Not to increase your stress, but to understand how to live a more healthy life – just want to be clear there.)

To help prevent PF and other foot problems you’ve got to of course look towards the feet to some degree too. Strong, supple, healthy feet! The easiest way to begin to improve foot health is to be barefoot as much as you comfortably and safely can. No, don’t go running barefoot if you’ve been wearing shoes all day long, but start by moving around barefoot in your house, little by little. Read “Healthy People = Barefoot People” to learn more.

There is so much more to say about PF but I’ve said it before many years ago and it still holds true today. So check out my original plantar fasciitis article, as well as my original plantar fasciitis video and note that I still look exactly the same seven years later!

As always, thanks for spending your time on the SockDoc site. You’re better for it, and hopefully with this understanding of the importance of plantar fasciitis natural treatments your “fascia-aponeurosis-itis-osis” will soon be a thing of the past.

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Sock Doc Podcast With Endurance Planet: Genetic Tests and The Pros and Cons To Discovering Your DNA https://sock-doc.com/genetics-dna/ https://sock-doc.com/genetics-dna/#respond Thu, 11 Jan 2018 00:42:05 +0000 http://sock-doc.com/?p=30427 Listen to a super-informative Endurance Planet Podcast with Tawnee and me, The Sock Doc, focusing on genetics and DNA! Topics Include: DNA, gentics, epigenetics & on getting your genes tested: DNA is the long-term information storage. Via transcription, RNA is formed, and this is how the gene expresses itself = ...

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sock doc podcastListen to a super-informative Endurance Planet Podcast with Tawnee and me, The Sock Doc, focusing on genetics and DNA!

Topics Include:

DNA, gentics, epigenetics & on getting your genes tested:

  • DNA is the long-term information storage.
  • Via transcription, RNA is formed, and this is how the gene expresses itself = epigenetics.
  • Circadian rhythms turn ~50% of genes on and off each day.
  • Environmental factors are important here.
  • Be careful of correlation vs. causation with genetic tests.
  • Pros and cons of genetic tests.
  • They may give data but not necessarily information that we can use.
  • Even with tests, there are few things we can predict – it’s too complex.
  • Timing is what’s important – what does that mean and why.
  • Using genetic tests to make individualized nutritional recommendations, aka the emerging field of nutrigenomics.
  • If your genetic test says you’re can metabolism a substance well or not (i.e. caffeine, alcohol) is that the be all end all? maybe not. health status matters.
  • The athletes you see do better on a certain diet may likely have that encoded in their genes, due to ancestry and/or childhood rearing, and, thus, their gene expressions (performance) respond optimally when they re-align with their genetic predisposition – but this is not yet verified in the literature.
    Steve thoughts?
  • Associations with diet improvement based on genetics (e.g. will some do better on low-carb, like those with FTO?), but we’re not there with genetic-based interventions.
  • Take homes: clinical application and applying these tests to your own needs.
  • Other health tests that may be more worth your buck and why.

Injury and biomechanical questions:

  • Help for patellar tendonitis.
  • Ramping up intensity and/or volume too quick is often the fast track to injury, take the time to heal and utilize a practitioner who will provide hands on help.

Should someone with a leg length discrepancy use orthotics?

  • Or should you first identify if it’s a true leg length discrepancy or some other underlying issue that can be fixed?
  • True leg length discrepancies are rare.

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Sock Doc Podcast #12 At Trail Runner Nation: Sleep – The Other Half of Training https://sock-doc.com/sock-doc-podcast-sleep/ https://sock-doc.com/sock-doc-podcast-sleep/#respond Fri, 08 Sep 2017 01:15:43 +0000 http://sock-doc.com/?p=30439 I’m back after a long hiatus on TRN to discuss why SLEEP really is very important to your training. We discuss: Why is sleep so important? Do athletes need more sleep? What is good restful sleep? What are some of the factors that keep us from restful sleep? Are stimulants ...

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I’m back after a long hiatus on TRN to discuss why SLEEP really is very important to your training. We discuss:

  • Why is sleep so important?
  • Do athletes need more sleep?
  • What is good restful sleep?
  • What are some of the factors that keep us from restful sleep?
  • Are stimulants effecting our sleep?
  • Common signs of poor sleep
  • Sleep monitors, are they useful?
  • Can you “catch up” on sleep?

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Sock Doc Podcast With Endurance Planet: Caffeine, Tendonitis, 5-MTHF and More! https://sock-doc.com/sock-doc-podcast-caffeine-tendonitis/ https://sock-doc.com/sock-doc-podcast-caffeine-tendonitis/#respond Sat, 12 Aug 2017 00:50:56 +0000 http://sock-doc.com/?p=30433 Listen and learn at Endurance Planet Podcast with Tawnee and me, The Sock Doc, focusing this time on genetics and DNA! Topics Include: Caffeine, insulin, folate, tendonitis, and questions from listeners.

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Listen and learn at Endurance Planet Podcast with Tawnee and me, The Sock Doc, focusing this time on genetics and DNA!

Topics Include: Caffeine, insulin, folate, tendonitis, and questions from listeners.

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Sock Doc Podcast With Endurance Planet: Meniscus Tears, Hiatal Hernias, and More https://sock-doc.com/sock-doc-podcast-endurance-planet/ https://sock-doc.com/sock-doc-podcast-endurance-planet/#respond Thu, 29 Jun 2017 01:04:57 +0000 http://sock-doc.com/?p=30436 Listen to a super-informative Endurance Planet Podcast with Tawnee and me, The Sock Doc, focusing on weight gain with Ironman training, meniscus tears, hiatal hernias, and yes – a lot more! Female health in ironman training. Females who gain weight (especially midsection) when training harder for Ironman – what gives? ...

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Listen to a super-informative Endurance Planet Podcast with Tawnee and me, The Sock Doc, focusing on weight gain with Ironman training, meniscus tears, hiatal hernias, and yes – a lot more!

  • Female health in ironman training.
    • Females who gain weight (especially midsection) when training harder for Ironman – what gives?
    • Female ironman athletes with thyroid issues.
    • The role of thyroid and gaining weight when training heavily – training may suppress thyroid even before it suppresses HPA axis function.
    • Does the MAF philosophy apply equally to women and men?
    • What happens when you overtrain aerobically – i.e. “aerobic excess.”
    • If not getting results with all aerobic-based training switch it up and add intensity (in moderation).
    • What to eat when IM training with thyroid issues, how to train in order to have a healthy body?
    • Make sure your carb intake matches activity – could be 80-200+ grams a day that you need!
  • Bioidentical thyroid supplement instead of synthetic thyroid meds – finding what works for you.
  • Problems with thyroid medication, Naturethroid.
  • Arthroscopy on a medial meniscus tear and post-surgery rehab – how to stay healthy, active and avoid re-injury?
  • With meniscus, you must identify and address underlying issues that caused the problem to prevent reoccurrence.
  • Could be biomechanical but could also be health and hormones.
  • The estrogen connection to ligament laxity – the applies to men too not just women!
  • Identifying endocrine disruptors – too high carb diet/carb intolerance, personal care products, household products, even candles!
  • Squat issues!
    • Dorsiflexion.
    • History of using an orthotic with a heel lift.
    • Toeing out.
    • Getting to 45 and 90 degrees.
    • Use a heel life or not to work on getting lower?
    • Range of motion and mobility issues.
  • Pros and cons to hands-on therapy (massage, chiro, ART) vs. self-myofacial release.
  • Do you really need to eat within X minutes of running? What if you are forced to run right before bed – still eat after?
  • When it DOES make sense to eat within 30-60min after a workout – long days, anaerobic sessions, etc.
  • Timing your food/meals and carbs if you’re a late-night runner.
  • Female athlete with a hiatal hernia and colitis – help!
    • Symptoms during swimming and biking.
    • Gut issues for years.
    • HH leads to pain, bloating, cramping, discomfort especially during all swims; nearly unable to do bricks let alone triathlons.
    • Relationship of breathing issues and chest vs. diaphragmatic breathing.
    • Effective DIY solutions for hiatal hernias – healing is possible!

 

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Sock Doc Podcast With Endurance Planet: Shoulder Labrum Tears, Cortisone Shots, B12, Aspirin, and More! https://sock-doc.com/shoulder-pain-labrum-tears/ https://sock-doc.com/shoulder-pain-labrum-tears/#respond Wed, 05 Apr 2017 00:47:45 +0000 http://sock-doc.com/?p=30386 Learn a lot from another excellent Endurance Planet Podcast with Tawnee – Healing An Unstable Shoulder, Is Plantar Fasciitis a Symptom of Overtraining? Plus: Risks of Repeated Cortisone Injections, Aspirin, Low B12 and More Healing an unstable shoulder joint after years of sports; treatments and recovery for athletes. Shoulder issues ...

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sock doc podcastLearn a lot from another excellent Endurance Planet Podcast with Tawnee – Healing An Unstable Shoulder, Is Plantar Fasciitis a Symptom of Overtraining? Plus: Risks of Repeated Cortisone Injections, Aspirin, Low B12 and More

  • Healing an unstable shoulder joint after years of sports; treatments and recovery for athletes.
  • Shoulder issues involve the labrum, bursitis and tendonitis.
  • Options for shoulder healing including PRP, prolotherapy and cortisone.
  • Male Ironman master’s athlete wants to know how to clean up his diet, where to start without going too crazy, and introducing new healthy habits.
  • Are there “go to” supplements that every endurance athlete should take?
  • When looking to add supplements, should one get a blood test first to find out the current state of health as well as a hormone panel?
  • “You can never supplement your way out of a bad diet.”
  • Why would one take a daily baby Aspirin; is it a good idea for athletes?
  • Aspirin risks: It can knock out sulfur and those taking it will also have higher magnesium requirements when taking a daily Aspirin.
  • Athlete with a history of cancer and pernicious anemia who’s now running using the MAF Method but experiencing some issues.
  • An issue like pernicious anemia could interfere with training/MAF; we discuss why.
    • A B12 deficiency and/or anemia can impair MAF development.
    • What’s the deal with high MCV.
  • MAF training and being so slow, continually. Should one add in intensity and VO2max workouts or strength training with the intent to boost MAF?
  • Cortisone for plantar fasciitis (PF).
  • The Sock Doc says, never everrrr get four cortisone injections in the same spot!
  • The real deal and real cause of PF in most cases.
  • PF is almost always tied into overtraining and related to adrenal burnout as well.

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Sock Doc Podcast With Endurance Planet: Ketosis Pros and Cons https://sock-doc.com/ketosis-pros-and-cons/ https://sock-doc.com/ketosis-pros-and-cons/#respond Wed, 04 Jan 2017 19:31:56 +0000 http://sock-doc.com/?p=30364 Endurance Planet Podcast with Tawnee – Food and Supplements to Ease Anxiety, Ketosis Pros and Cons, and Chronically High Blood Sugar. How to help athletes with excess anxiety and unnecessary stress, mentally speaking, especially females? Are there supplements, certain macro ratios or specific foods would we advise for athletes dealing with anxiety, ...

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Ketosis Pros and ConsEndurance Planet Podcast with Tawnee – Food and Supplements to Ease Anxiety, Ketosis Pros and Cons, and Chronically High Blood Sugar.

  • How to help athletes with excess anxiety and unnecessary stress, mentally speaking, especially females?
  • Are there supplements, certain macro ratios or specific foods would we advise for athletes dealing with anxiety, worry and high stress?
  • Should one avoid IF and sugar? How to find the proper nutrition for one’s cognitive needs?
  • Should one get tested to measure for deficiencies and imbalances, which is best to do first: urine organic acids, blood or hormone?
  • GABA and nourishing your neurotransmitters.
  • Steve shares his balanced approached to diet and nutrition.
  • Pros and cons of nutritional ketosis, and understanding the risks of taking it too far.
  • Trouble in keto land: Ironman athlete wants to know if going from low-carb/loosely Paleo to fully ketogenic was too much for the body and the cause of his performance decline.
    • Other potential negative impacts from going full keto: an increase in resting HR, drop in HRV, drop in power, slower MAF pace, and increase in racing HR.
  • The concept of carb cycling for best results
  • Adopting MAF after year of dealing with an injury and also learning to wean off carb dependence.
  • When diet, fasted workouts and low carb can go too far, especially for females.
  • Achieving healthy body composition and understanding the red flags if your body is getting too lean.
  • Could you have signs of an eating disorder and not realize it?
  • Abnormally high blood glucose reading despite a lower carb diet, healthy lifestyle and regular exercise?
  • What should you do if glucose levels commonly are 105-120 up to 140s upon waking. Could this be a sign of a more serious issue that requires investigation?

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Sock Doc Podcast With Endurance Planet: Is Vitamin D Over-Hyped? https://sock-doc.com/vitamin-d-podcast/ https://sock-doc.com/vitamin-d-podcast/#respond Wed, 04 Jan 2017 19:15:14 +0000 http://sock-doc.com/?p=30360 Listen to this super-informative Vitamin D Podcast with Tawnee over at Endurance Planet: Show notes: We discuss the real deal with Vitamin D–yes, it’s super important, but are we over-hyping its importance and the need to supplement these days? It turns into quite the discussion! Before that we catch up ...

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Injury Treatment & Prevention PodcastListen to this super-informative Vitamin D Podcast with Tawnee over at Endurance Planet:

Show notes: We discuss the real deal with Vitamin D–yes, it’s super important, but are we over-hyping its importance and the need to supplement these days? It turns into quite the discussion! Before that we catch up with The Sock Doc on his new book, The Systems Health Care Manual, a 175+ page manual geared toward practitioners to aid in evaluating, diagnosing, and treating patients. You don’t have to be a practitioner either to benefit from this manual! Get it here. Also: We ask Steve how to find a good chiropractor and/or massage therapist? Do we need both?

On Vitamin D and other essential vitamins and nutrients:

  • Vitamin D’s importance for athletes and the general population, but we take a critical look. What D actually does for us, the active form of D (and the conversion that takes place in our body for the active form of D), measuring in blood labs, optimal levels, supplementing with D and dosages, ways to get D more sun to get your D.
  • Clinical history: Vitamins E & D
  • Vitamin E was the big hype back in the day: people told to supplement, usually was synthetic form, led to hormonal issues, common problem associated was hip pain, with less E supplementing improvements occured
  • Now, these days Vitamin D is the big hype
  • A lot of experts and studies say we need to “get our Vitamin D up,” is this valid?
  • Discussing normal ranges and units used, ng/ml vs. nmol/L
  • What about Vitamin A? (Great for immune wellness)
    • Why Steve says he’s often more inclined to prescribe Vitamin A for a client than D
    • Often fear associated with Vitamin A due to potential side effects, toxicity issues, and liver issues.
    • Types of Vitamin A—check the labels on your supplements to see what you are really getting. (beta carotene, palmitic acid, retinol)
  • And lots more!

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Vivobarefoot Winter Boots Review – Women’s Tabi Hi and Men’s Scott https://sock-doc.com/vivobarefoot-winter-boots-review/ https://sock-doc.com/vivobarefoot-winter-boots-review/#comments Mon, 28 Nov 2016 02:59:21 +0000 http://sock-doc.com/?p=30334 Welcome to winter, and a couple of very popular Vivobarefoot winter boots to keep your feet dry and snugly warm. This Vivobarefoot winter boots review is for women, the new Tabi Hi, and the popular winter boot for men, the Scott. Another reason I wanted to put this review out ...

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Vivobarefoot Winter Boots ReviewWelcome to winter, and a couple of very popular Vivobarefoot winter boots to keep your feet dry and snugly warm. This Vivobarefoot winter boots review is for women, the new Tabi Hi, and the popular winter boot for men, the Scott. Another reason I wanted to put this review out now for both boots is because they’re both on sale at Vivo’s website. The Tabi Hi’s price has been cut more than in half from $248 to $120 and the Scott is $50 off down to $130. They’re both unbelievable deals. Now, ladies first.

Vivobarefoot Winter Boots ReviewNo, as much as I like the look of the Tabi Hi, it’s been my wife MaryBeth who has been sporting them around town and in the woods for the past many weeks. Here’s me typing while she’s standing next to me: “The Tabi Hi is super comfortable and easy to slip on. Your feet stay warm without being overheated. I’ll definitely get a lot of use from these as they’re so versatile. It’s a boot I’ve already worn while hiking in the woods and I’ve worn them out on super hot dates with my super hot husband.” Okay, maybe I put some of those words in myself, but the zip design really does make them easy to slip on and off. Let’s move on –

Vivobarefoot Winter Boots ReviewVivobarefoot Winter Boots ReviewThe Vivobarefoot Tabi Hi is made from eco canvas. It’s vegan, which also makes it one of the few (maybe only?) times I have recommended something vegan. We’ll see if the Vegans out there can take the teasing. Probably not. But seriously, both the Tabi Hi and the Scott are 50% recycled PET plastic bottles – how cool is that? (Answer: Super) With thermal fleece and sealed seams you can get these boots really wet and your feet will stay dry. As with the other Vivo winterproof series, there’s a 3.5mm removable insole to keep you even warmer if you need it.

Vivobarefoot Winter Boots ReviewLet’s move on to the second Vivobarefoot winter boots review now for us guys – the Scott. This is now my second pair of Vivo boots if you’re counting the Vivobarefoot Tracker that I recently reviewed. The Scott, however, is not nearly as rugged as the Tracker. The Scott is made for urban environments and maybe some light gravel trail hiking. Though it’s waterproof and winterproof like the other boots (including the recently mentioned ladies Tabi Hi), this isn’t a boot you put on to go get muddy in some streams. Since it hasn’t snowed here yet in North Carolina, I can’t say how dry and warm your feet will stay in these boots, but based off their design, I’m sure you’d do just fine. They’re definitely very warm. Let me say that again – the Scott’s are very, very, very warm. I pulled out the 3.5mm insole and just walking around the airport recently got my feet almost too warm. I had to take them off on the plane. So theses are definitely boots to keep you warm while you’re doing stuff – you guessed it – outside.

Vivobarefoot Winter Boots ReviewThe Scotts are a great looking boot and very comfortable overall. I really like them. I need to change the lacing though as the way they come the laces are looped from the outside and that makes it a bit slow to slip on and off. They fit very much like the Vivobarefoot Gobi, still one of my favorite Vivo shoes, but the Scott is definitely one to own if you need some city/light hiking winter boots. On sale now at $130 I’d say that’s a great deal. Sorry Vegans – the Scott is made from African leather from free-roaming cows. Vivo says, “They have lived a little and made love under the sun,” and that’s something I think about every time I put these boots on. Now you will too. Enjoy.

Vivobarefoot Winter Boots ReviewI don’t get paid any money from Vivobarefoot for my shoe reviews, nor am I an affiliate. I just think they’ve got great shoes. (We did however, receive the Tabi Hi and Scott boots for free.) If you’re interested in injury prevention and optimum health and fitness as I am, then Vivobarefoot will fit your lifestyle. Less shoe is always more! Other Vivobarefoot shoe reviews here. I hope you enjoyed this Vivobarefoot winter boots review!

 

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